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Remington 870 Review

Few things in the world of firearms should be called “iconic”. Surely those firearms that were and are revolutionary in their design qualify, such as the 1911, the Glock, the AR-15/M16, Mauser and the Colt Single Action Army, to name a few. But for all the innovation and machining genius that went into these firearms, sometimes we can also find the “Iconic” class applies to a firearm that did not innovate the design or functionality of a “new” gun, but one that has improved upon an existing design and maintained a level of quality that is unsurpassed.

This firearm could only be the Remington 870 pump action shotgun and therefore this is a Remington 870 review.

To a new or long seasoned shooter looking for versatility, reliability and just an overall multi-functioning firearm, one needs look no further than the Remington 870. Remington 870 tactical 300x70 Remington 870 ReviewWhen the first one rolled off the assembly line in 1949, no one really expected that by 1996, seven million of them would have sold. Still fewer would have thought that by 2009 it would top ten million and literally become the best selling shotgun in history.

Still not convinced? Fair enough. Who uses the Remington 870? Bird hunters, deer hunters, turkey hunters, predator hunters, small game hunters, dangerous game hunters, competition shooters (skeet, trap, 5-stand, sporting clays, 3-gun), law enforcement (police, SWAT), Secret Service, and all divisions of the US military. It also happens to be the #1 selling shotgun for home defense.

So why is the 870 so iconic? Simply because it works…every time. What other shotgun could be dragged through the mud—barrel filled—and then rinsed off and out with a garden hose and then fired without a hiccup? (Not that I would recommend doing this.)

Available in either 12 or 20 gauge, the pump action, bottom loader with side ejection on a dual-action bar frame is simplicity in itself to disassemble and reassemble with minimal information and experience or tools. Thousands of aftermarket parts are available to change the look and feel of the firearm from your typical wood-stock-blued-metal original configuration to your most high-tech tactical home defense or zombie killing machine.

Shooting an 870 in its original configuration is precisely what you want and need a pump action shotgun to feel like and shoot like. Manageable recoil, precision controls and sights (front bead standard), smooth action and yankable trigger (as any good shotgun should). Of course, the shotgun can be adjusted with shims and spacers for changes to length of pull (distance between the trigger and the center of the buttpad), the pitch (angle of the butt and ultimately how the gun fits in your shoulder pocket), and the cast Remington 870 Review 300x126 Remington 870 Review(a slight bend in the stock to help place the rib in line with the shooter’s eye) as well as just about any other modification you might need.

This author owns two Remington 870’s—a beautiful Wingmaster that can shoot any size or power shell and an Express model for “playing”, and these guns represent the two ends of the series (and price) but I love them both and wouldn’t trade or sell them for the world. I have literally gone through every hunting season possible as well as played every “game” that you can use a shotgun for with these guns—expecting and receiving nothing but the highest quality and results. Go buy one.

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